Tag Archive: Do Good


Payin’ It Forward

pay it forwardIt doesn’t take much to make a day a little brighter for those around you, and, in doing so, for yourself. The other day at work, I witnessed a random act of kindness between two strangers. A woman making a purchase and I were chatting about the weather turning a bit more Spring-like as I was completing her transaction. The transaction was somewhat complex, and took about 6 minutes to A man behind her in line was patiently waiting. The woman apologized to him for his having to wait for her transaction to be completed. He smiled and said, “No problem.” Then, the woman took his item that was sitting on the counter next to her, and asked me to ring it up on her card, indicating that it was in concern for his time spent waiting. It was an $18 item. The man protested, thanking her, but she insisted. He reluctantly relented, thanking her profusely, and said to her, “You didn’t have to do that!” Her reply? “Yes, I know. But that’s exactly why I am doing it. You can do the same –something nice and unexpected–for someone else someday.” “Pay it forward, my friend”, I said. “That’s how you keep the good going ’round.”

He thanked her again, and left with a big smile on his face. And so did she. And I left work with a happy heart that day.

The Author:  Kathy Clark

Kathy Clark

“Live to Give” typifies her heart’s truest desire.  Her hope is to continue to Do Good through reaching out to others through ThinkGood, sharing with all of you  her energy and appreciation for the (sometimes hidden-suddenly revealed) moments of beauty in life.

 

101 Inspiring Happiness Quotes

by HENRIK EDBERG

 
 
 

 

The written word is truly an amazing thing.

With the help of it we can record out innermost thoughts and spread them if we like.

With the help of the written word we can look far, far back into time, through the decades, the centuries and, yes, even the millennias.

Today I would like to look back into the past and see what the wise people who have walked on this earth can tell us about happiness and how to uncover it. No matter if you live today or lived two thousand years ago.

 

This is 101 of the most inspiring, touching and helpful thoughts from the past on happiness.

  1. “Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.”
    Buddha
  2. “Happiness is the art of never holding in your mind the memory of any unpleasant thing that has passed.”
    Unknown
  3. “To be happy, we must not be too concerned with others.”
    Albert Camus
  4. “If you want happiness for an hour — take a nap.’
    If you want happiness for a day — go fishing.
    If you want happiness for a year — inherit a fortune.
    If you want happiness for a lifetime — help someone else.”
    Chinese Proverb
  5. “The moments of happiness we enjoy take us by surprise. It is not that we seize them, but that they seize us.”
    Ashley Montagu
  6. “Don’t rely on someone else for your happiness and self-worth. Only you can be responsible for that. If you can’t love and respect yourself – no one else will be able to make that happen. Accept who you are – completely; the good and the bad – and make changes as YOU see fit – not because you think someone else wants you to be different.”
    Stacey Charter
  7. “It isn’t what you have, or who you are, or where you are, or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about.”
    Dale Carnegie
  8. “It’s a helluva start, being able to recognize what makes you happy.”
    Lucille Ball
  9. “Don’t underestimate the value of Doing Nothing, of just going along, listening to all the things you can’t hear, and not bothering.”
    Winnie the Pooh
  10. “There is only one way to happiness and that is to cease worrying about things which are beyond the power of our will.”
    Epictetus
  11. “We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have.”
    Frederick Keonig
  12. “Sometimes your joy is the source of your smile, but sometimes your smile can be the source of your joy.”
    Thich Nhat Hanh
  13. “Perhaps they are not stars, but rather openings in heaven where the love of our lost ones pours through and shines down upon us to let us know they are happy.”
    Eskimo Proverb
  14. “To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness.”
    Mary Stuart
  15. “There are more things to alarm us than to harm us, and we suffer more often in apprehension than reality.”
    Seneca
  16. “Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person is essential to your own.”
    Robert A. Heinlein
  17. “Happy people plan actions, they don’t plan results.”
    Dennis Waitley
  18. “Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.”
    Mahatma Gandhi
  19. “The only joy in the world is to begin.”
    Cesare Pavese
  20. “Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go”
    Oscar WildeImage
  21. “Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.”
    Marthe Troly-Curtin
  22. “Nobody can be uncheered with a balloon”
    Winnie the Pooh
  23. “Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.”
    Herman Cain
  24. “What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others.”
    Confucius
  25. “There is only one cause of unhappiness: the false beliefs you have in your head, beliefs so widespread, so commonly held, that it never occurs to you to question them.”
    Anthony de Mello
  26. “Happiness is not something ready-made. It comes from your own actions.”
    Dalai Lama
  27. “When one door of happiness closes, another opens, but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one that has been opened for us.”
    Helen Keller
  28. “Happiness depends upon ourselves.”
    Aristotle
  29. “It is more fitting for a man to laugh at life than to lament over it.”
    Seneca
  30. “The reason people find it so hard to be happy is that they always see the past better than it was, the present worse than it is, and the future less resolved than it will be.”
    Marcel Pagnol
  31. “If men would consider not so much wherein they differ, as wherein they agree, there would be far less of uncharitableness and angry feeling in the world.”
    Joseph Addison
  32. “Happiness is having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city.”
    George Burns
  33. “Happiness is not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort.”
    Franklin D. Roosevelt
  34. “The pleasure which we most rarely experience gives us greatest delight.”
    Epictetus
  35. “It’s been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind firmly that you will.”
    L.M. Montgomery
  36. “Happiness is acceptance.”
    Unknown
  37. “The secret of happiness is not in doing what one likes, but in liking what one does.”
    James M. Barrie
  38. “We begin from the recognition that all beings cherish happiness and do not want suffering. It then becomes both morally wrong and pragmatically unwise to pursue only one’s own happiness oblivious to the feelings and aspirations of all others who surround us as members of the same human family. The wiser course is to think of others when pursuing our own happiness.”
    Dalai Lama
  39. “Most people would rather be certain they’re miserable, than risk being happy.”
    Dr. Robert Anthony
  40. “The unhappy derive comfort from the misfortunes of others.”
    Aesop
  41. “For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them.”
    Seneca
  42. “A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin; what else does a man need to be happy?”
    Albert Einstein
  43. “Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.”
    Bertrand Russell
  44. “The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassions, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.”
    Elizabeth Kubler-Ross
  45. “Happiness is a myth we seek,
    If manifested surely irks;
    Like river speeding to the plain,
    On its arrival slows and murks.
    For man is happy only in
    His aspiration to the heights;
    When he attains his goal, he cools
    And longs for other distant flights.”
    Kahlil Gibran
  46. “Happiness is a state of activity.”
    Aristotle
  47. “This planet has – or rather had – a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movement of small green pieces of paper, which was odd because on the whole it wasn’t the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.”
    Douglas Adams
  48. “Since you get more joy out of giving joy to others, you should put a good deal of thought into the happiness that you are able to give.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt
  49. “Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.”
    Confucius
  50. “The two enemies of human happiness are pain and boredom.”
    Arthur Schopenhauer
  51. “Men spend their lives in anticipations, in determining to be vastly happy at some period when they have time. But the present time has one advantage over every other – it is our own. Past opportunities are gone, future have not come. We may lay in a stock of pleasures, as we would lay in a stock of wine; but if we defer the tasting of them too long, we shall find that both are soured by age.”
    Charles Caleb Colton
  52. “Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.”
    Marcus Aurelius Antoninus
  53. “Happy he who learns to bear what he cannot change.”
    Friedrich Schiller
  54. “When I look back on all these worries, I remember the story of the old man who said on his deathbed that he had had a lot of trouble in his life, most of which had never happened.”
    Winston Churchill
  55. “I’d far rather be happy than right any day.”
    Douglas Adams
  56. “Everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you’re climbing it.”
    Andy Rooney
  57. “The foolish man seeks happiness in the distance, the wise grows it under his feet.”
    James Oppenheim
  58. “Action may not always bring happiness; but there is no happiness without action.”
    Benjamin Disraeli
  59. “The greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.”
    Martha Washington
  60. “Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory.”
    Albert Schweitzer
  61. “Our envy always lasts longer than the happiness of those we envy.”
    Heraclitus
  62. “Happiness is a how; not a what. A talent, not an object.”
    Herman Hesse
  63. “No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.”
    Aesop
  64. “Every man has his secret sorrows which the world knows not; and often times we call a man cold when he is only sad.”
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  65. “Happiness is something that comes into our lives through doors we don’t even remember leaving open.”
    Rose Lane
  66. “The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother, the ecology, or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny.”
    Albert Ellis
  67. “I, not events, have the power to make me happy or unhappy today. I can choose which it shall be. Yesterday is dead, tomorrow hasn’t arrived yet. I have just one day, today, and I’m going to be happy in it.”
    Groucho Marx
  68. “Just because it didn’t last forever, doesn’t mean it wasn’t worth your while.”
    Unknown
  69. “Your work is discover your world and then with all your heart give yourself to it.”
    Buddha
  70. “That man is richest whose pleasures are cheapest.”
    Henry David Thoreau
  71. “Happiness always looks small while you hold it in your hands, but let it go, and you learn at once how big and precious it is.”
    Maxim Gorky
  72. “A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people to whom it is easy to do good, and who are not accustomed to have it done to them; then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one’s neighbor — such is my idea of happiness.”
    Leo Tolstoy
  73. “It was only a sunny smile, and little it cost in the giving, but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
  74. “If thou wilt make a man happy, add not unto his riches but take away from his desires.”
    Epicurus
  75. “Plenty of people miss their share of happiness, not because they never found it, but because they didn’t stop to enjoy it.”
    William Feather
  76. “Gratitude is a vaccine, an antitoxin, and an antiseptic.”
    John Henry Jowett
  77. “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt
  78. “And remember, no matter where you go, there you are.”
    Confucius
  79. “If you are too busy to laugh, you are too busy.”
    Proverb
  80. “Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature…. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.”
    Helen Keller
  81. “For most of life, nothing wonderful happens. If you don’t enjoy getting up and working and finishing your work and sitting down to a meal with family or friends, then the chances are you’re not going to be very happy. If someone bases his/her happiness on major events like a great job, huge amounts of money, a flawlessly happy marriage or a trip to Paris, that person isn’t going to be happy much of the time.
    If, on the other hand, happiness depends on a good breakfast, flowers in the yard, a drink or a nap, then we are more likely to live with quite a bit of happiness.”
    Andy Rooney
  82. “Learn to let go. That is the key to happiness.”
    Buddha
  83. “The first recipe for happiness is: avoid too lengthy meditation on the past.”
    Andre Maurois
  84. “The grass is always greener where you water it.”
    Unknown
  85. “Enjoy your own life without comparing it with that of another.”
    Marquis de Condorcet
  86. “On a deeper level you are already complete. When you realize that, there is a playful, joyous energy behind what you do.”
    Eckhart Tolle
  87. “The happiest people in the world are those who feel absolutely terrific about themselves, and this is the natural outgrowth of accepting total responsibility for every part of their life.”
    Brian Tracy
  88. “Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”
    Marcel Proust
  89. “We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.”
    George Bernard Shaw
  90. “Worry never robs tomorrow of its sorrow. It only saps today of its joy.”
    Leo Buscaglia
  91. “A well-developed sense of humor is the pole that adds balance to your steps as you walk the tightrope of life.”
    William Arthur Ward
  92. “Optimism is a happiness magnet. If you stay positive, good things and good people will be drawn to you.”
    Mary Lou Retton
  93. “I believe compassion to be one of the few things we can practice that will bring immediate and long-term happiness to our lives.”
    Dalai Lama
  94. “Follow your bliss and don’t be afraid, and doors will open where you didn’t know they were going to be.”
    Joseph Campbell
  95. “Happiness consists of living each day as if it were the first day of your honeymoon and the last day of your vacation.”
    Leo Tolstoy
  96. “Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.”
    Abraham Lincoln
  97. “Being happy doesn’t mean everything is perfect. It means you’ve decided to look beyond the imperfections.”
    Unknown
  98. “The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain. Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter’s oven? And is not the lute that soothes your spirit, the very wood that was hollowed with knives?
    When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy. When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see in truth that you are weeping for that which has been your delight.”
    Kahlil Gibran
  99. “If you spend your whole life waiting for the storm, you’ll never enjoy the sunshine.”
    Morris West
  100. “Life will bring you pain all by itself. Your responsibility is to create joy.”
    Milton Erickson
  101. “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”
    Mark Twain

What is your favorite quote on happiness? Feel free to share the best one(s) you have found in this article or in your life in the comments section below.

Image by D. Sharon Pruitt (license).

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Jeff Ernst, Entrepreneur

Happy September!  What a great time of the year.  The season of smells and football.  Wet leaves, warm hot chocolate, apple pies, pumpkin carvings, apple picking, and homemade soups.  And with it, warm bright earthy tones, warm fires and rosy cheeks.

For us at Think Good, it marks our Sixth Month Anniversary.  We have lots to celebrate including getting to know many of you.  We’ve gone through many whiteboard markers, erasers, ink, business plans, LOTS of quotes, monetization plans, and various strategies for plans B, C, D and yes, even E, F and G.

As we have shared from the beginning, we are building this company with modern, yet proven business philosophies – working with YOU as our expert.  This exclusive group we call “The Inner Circle” contributes their thoughts and ideas and becomes a part of the overall process.

During these calls Think Good’s senior leadership, Ann-Marie Bland and Jeff Ernst joined by the rest of the team will explain Think Good, company objectives, the excitement and groundswell that’s building, and how you can participate.  All attendees will leave with an understanding of Think Good’s movement and knowledge about “what’s under the hood” (it’s much bigger and exciting than we have announced – – in fact, we haven’t formally announced anything!).  We will share our plans beyond the Facebook page (we are much more than that) and where we’d like to take the company with your input.

Ann-Marie Bland

Ann-Marie Bland, founder

The minimum requirement to participate on this Advisory Board is regular participation in Wednesday evening calls, completion of three or so surveys, and quotes and endorsements to be used on the website and marketing materials.  The maximum participation is open ended. For those that want to be active, we certainly could use the help.  To participate on the calls, it’s as simple as dialing a toll free phone number and clicking a link.  Just sit back, watch, listen and more importantly TELL US WHAT YOU THINK.

We are looking to bring “100 In The Know” members into the fold – as part of our advisory group.  The people that participate, like us at Think Good, have the potential to create something that does truthfully impact lives.  Lives of potentially thousands, millions and even billions if we all push the message out.  Anything is possible.   The world wants positive energy and we can provide it.

As a member, you will be given the red carpet treatment as our most important members of the team.  Virtual hugs, lots of laughs, precious moments, and an overall Feel GOOD feeling.   We are a startup and make the experience fun and rewarding as crazy as it is.

Through social media, our networks, coming together in a community where ideas can be shared and the message echo throughout; you can be the catalyst (an advanced and hopefully more successful “Telephone Game”.)  If each of us throws a stone out in our part of the water, causing ripples that eventually blend into each other representing the like minded community that is living in harmony of people helping people.

An exciting component to Think Good is the free exchange of information shared  (causes, volunteers, donors, fundraisers) allowing all people wanting to help and the people in need of help, to tap into a community of like minded people, share best practices and other successful ideas.  Think Good breaks down the silos and allows sharing of knowledge for over a million non-profits.  Think Good is a place to inspire, encourage, connect, and even witness the good happenings in the world, and at the end of the day, that’s what we are all here to do.  Good.

Some fun facts you didn’t know about Think Good:

  • We have people working with Think Good from 4 time zones with a total of 16 people working on the project to some capacity.
  • We are a completely virtual office and work through online tools, chat rooms and video conferences to keep us on the same page.
  • TG is comprised of stay at home mom’s,  new college grads, high school students, Think Good kids (the team’s kids), to corporate senior executives wanting to use their talents to give back.  The current team has been responsible for building and successfully achieving financial goals for over 12 technology businesses and combined have over 150 years of entrepreneurial experience.  High profile brands and companies under their leadership include NFL, Monopoly, NASCAR, Major League Baseball, Sony, Microsoft, Compaq to name only a few .
  • Think Good is reaching approximately 60K-100K people per day in 18 different countries and 5 languages. Our totally community consists of approximately 6,000 members.

Background:

The non-profit, NGO’s and private sector have historically been technically underserved causing antiquated processes and inefficiencies.  The benefits technology could bring communication, management of help and helpers finding opportunities to give back are not always easy to find.  A common place where everyone is working to better the world, can consult each other, or work together for a common cause, all in the best interest of those needing our help.  Because of labor intensive methods and tireless fundraising and marketing efforts, many of these organizations are struggling.   Think Good’s intends to build a community of “do gooders” (for lack of a better name), bringing together providers of help and those that are in need within the same community, brought together with technology.  By bringing together these like minded, good hearted people under the umbrella of Think Good, we break down the walls, bring together the silos, get smarter and more efficient, increase the impact on social matters and engage more citizens in the act of helping people.

Dream with us for just a minute:  Imagine a world where people helping people is as part of a daily routines as brushing teeth.  How cool is that?  A world where people smile at each other, wave,  people need people and when the interaction happens, people get out of solitude, out of our own minds – – – and feel better.  Someday, we might be part of the reason for the increase of the well-being of society.

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Thank you for joining Think Good and for your continued support.  The fast growth we’ve had to date indicates that the Think Good philosophy resonates, spreading positive attitude, the GOOD, the movement, and the benefits it will have on society. Our mission, together, is favorably impact the wellbeing of others through people helping people.  As Arianna Huffington states in her high profile blog, The Huffington Post,  “Success has to be measured beyond power and money. There is a Third Metric: wellbeing and/or happiness achieved through giving.”

We could not have said it better.  If you are interested in participating, please fill out the form below and you will be sent instructions (or you can use the above message board).

We look forward to being with you.  In the meantime, don’t forget to:  Think Good. Do Good. Feel Good.

All the best,

Ann-Marie Bland, founder & The Think Good Team

Happiness has many advantages. Happy individuals have healthier perspectives, less heart attacks, strokes and other ailments.  They also have productivity advantages. People who consider themselves happy show higher productivity and output.

This is Good

An old story is told of a king in Africa who had a close friend with whom he grew up. The friend had a habit of looking at every situation that ever occurred in his life (positive or negative) and remarking, “This is good!”

One day the king and his friend were out on a hunting expedition. The friend would load and prepare the guns for the king. The friend had apparently done something wrong in preparing one of the guns, for after taking the gun from his friend, the king fired it and his thumb was blown off. Examining the situation the friend remarked as usual, “This is good!” To which the king replied, “No, this is NOT good!” and proceeded to send his friend to jail.

About a year later, the king was hunting in an area that he should have known to stay clear of. Cannibals captured him and took him to their village. They tied his hands, stacked some wood, set up a stake and bound him to the stake. As they came near to set fire to the wood, they noticed that the king was missing a thumb. Being superstitious, they never ate anyone that was less than whole. So untying the king, they sent him on his way.

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“This is good?” he said to everything.

As he returned home, he was reminded of the event that had taken his thumb and felt remorse for his treatment of his friend. He went immediately to the jail to speak with his friend. “You were right,” he said, “it was good that my thumb was blown off.” And he proceeded to tell the friend all that had just happened. “And so I am very sorry for sending you to jail for so long. It was bad for me to do this.”

“No,” his friend replied, “This is good!” “What do you mean,’This is good’? How could it be good that I sent my friend to jail for a year?” “If I had NOT been in jail, I would have been with you.”

– Author Unknown

An Inspirational Story: Get Up

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Bringing a giraffe into the world is a tall order. A baby giraffe falls 10 feet from its mother’s womb and usually lands on its back. Within seconds it rolls over and tucks its legs under its body. From this position it considers the world for the first time and shakes off the last vestiges of the birthing fluid from its eyes and ears. Then the mother giraffe rudely introduces its offspring to the reality of life.

In his book, “A View from the Zoo”, Gary Richmond describes how a newborn giraffe learns its first lesson.

motivational
The mother giraffe lowers her head long enough to take a quick look. Then she positions herself directly over her calf. She waits for about a minute, and then she does the most unreasonable thing. She swings her long, pendulous leg outward and kicks her baby, so that it is sent sprawling head over heels.

When it doesn’t get up, the violent process is repeated over and over again. The struggle to rise is momentous. As the baby calf grows tired, the mother kicks it again to stimulate its efforts. Finally, the calf stands for the first time on its wobbly legs.

Then the mother giraffe does the most remarkable thing. She kicks it off its feet again. Why? She wants it to remember how it got up. In the wild, baby giraffes must be able to get up as quickly as possible to stay with the herd, where there is safety. Lions, hyenas, leopards, and wild hunting dogs all enjoy young giraffes, and they’d get it too, if the mother didn’t teach her calf to get up quickly and get with it.

The late Irving Stone understood this. He spent a lifetime studying greatness, writing novelized biographies of such men as Michelangelo, Vincent van Gogh, Sigmund Freud, and Charles Darwin.

Stone was once asked if he had found a thread that runs through the lives of all these exceptional people. He said, “I write about people who sometime in their life have a vision or dream of something that should be accomplished and they go to work.

“They are beaten over the head, knocked down, vilified, and for years they get nowhere. But every time they’re knocked down they stand up. You cannot destroy these people. And at the end of their lives they’ve accomplished some modest part of what they set out to do.”

– Craig B. Larson
Illustrations for Preaching & Teaching from Leadership Journal

An Inspirational Story: The Pebbles

The Touchstone

When the great library of Alexandria burned, the story goes, one book was saved. But it was not a valuable book; and so a poor man, who could read a little, bought it for a few coppers.
The book wasn’t very interesting, but between its pages there was something very interesting indeed. It was a thin strip of vellum on which was written the secret of the “Touchstone”!

The touchstone was a small pebble that could turn any common metal into pure gold. The writing explained that it was lying among thousands and thousands of other pebbles that looked exactly like it. But the secret was this: The real stone would feel warm, while ordinary pebbles are cold.

So the man sold his few belongings, bought some simple supplies, camped on the seashore, and began testing pebbles.

stone

Opportunities Are Easily Thrown Away

He knew that if he picked up ordinary pebbles and threw them down again because they were cold, he might pick up the same pebble hundreds of times. So, when he felt one that was cold, he threw it into the sea. He spent a whole day doing this but none of them was the touchstone. Yet he went on and on this way. Pick up a pebble. Cold – throw it into the sea. Pick up another. Throw it into the sea.

The days stretched into weeks and the weeks into months. One day, however, about midafternoon, he picked up a pebble and it was warm. He threw it into the sea before he realized what he had done. He had formed such a strong habit of throwing each pebble into the sea that when the one he wanted came along, he still threw it away.

So it is with opportunity. Unless we are vigilant, it’s asy to fail to recognize an opportunity when it is in hand and it’s just as easy to throw it away.

– Author Unknown

A man stopped at a flower shop to order some flowers to be wired to his mother who lived two hundred miles away.

Think Good Story

Earth’s little reminders happen at the right times and can be a way to realign thinking.

As he got out of his car he noticed a young girl sitting on the curb sobbing.

He asked her what was wrong and she replied, “I wanted to buy a red rose for my mother. But I only have seventy-five cents, and a rose costs two dollars.”

The man smiled and said, “Come on in with me. I’ll buy you a rose.”

He bought the little girl her rose and ordered his own mother’s flowers.

As they were leaving he offered the girl a ride home. She said, “Yes, please! You can take me to my mother.”

She directed him to a cemetery, where she placed the rose on a freshly dug grave.

The man returned to the flower shop, canceled the wire order, picked up a bouquet and drove the two hundred miles to his mother’s house.

(Author Unknown)

The Power of Awesomeness

Do One Awesome Thing Each Day

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